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Shades of Chocolate: Terre de Feu Ink Mixing

I’ve been wanting to mix brown ink to create different shades of chocolate and finally found some time to give it a try. I chose J. Herbin Terre De Feu because it seemed like a good medium brown color to get started with, but J. Herbin Lie de Thé or Café des Îles probably would have been good choices too-colors for future ink mixing for sure. This ink has a red tone it, so the name Terre de Feu or Land of Fire seems very fitting. For this experiment I used a ratio of five parts J. Herbin’s Terre De Feu ink and one part of another ink.

Terre de Feu plus Noodler’s Black ink produced a nice dark chocolate brown color with reddish undertones.

Terre de Feu and Noodler’s Shah’s Rose created a dark maroon color that I’d put in the “red wine” category as opposed to the chocolate category.

Adding Noodler’s Yellow to Terre de Feu made the best milk chocolate color in this bunch.

Noodler’s Navajo Turquoise and Terre de Feu made a brown-black that at first glance just looks black to me. It’s amazing how adding one part turquoise blue ink can create such a dark color. If I’m in the mood to write in brown-black ink in the future I’ll have to keep this one in mind.

Terre de Feu and J. Herbin Lierre Sauvage (green) also created a nice chocolate brown that has a bit more of a yellow undertone in it than the Terre de Feu plus black.

J. Herbin Violette Pensée and Terre de Feu mixed together made a dark maroon color that I would also categorize as “red wine”.

Terre de Feu and J. Herbin 1670 Anniversary ink (red) produced what I would call a burnt umber or red-brown color.

Interestingly, the character of Terre de Feu ink was such that it did not want to stay in the grooves of my glass pen and made the writing samples a bit difficult except for the combination with the 1670 Anniversary ink. No harmful explosions occurred as a result of mixing these particular colors of Noodler’s and J. Herbin fountain pen inks. Stay tuned for part two of this experiment using different ratios of ink colors.

What is your favorite brown fountain pen ink?



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