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Ink Mixing Color Chart

From Ink Mixing (click on the picture to enlarge it)

For those of you new to color theory, figuring out how much of which colors to mix together to create the custom fountain pen ink color you want can be daunting! We figure most of you fellow fountain pen users already are creative people, but if you feel you need a bit of help with ink mixing, we've created a basic color chart as a guide.

This chart displays the recipe, or ratios of which ink colors to use to create other custom ink colors. For example, mixing one part magenta (Noodler's Shah's Rose) and one part yellow makes orange.

You might think that one part magenta and one part cyan would make purple, but instead it makes a violet-blue. To create purple ink you need only one part cyan (Noodler's Navajoe Turquoise) and five parts magenta (Noodler's Shah's Rose).

In general, it is best to start with the lightest color of ink and slowly mix in the darker colors until you get the results that you want. For example, a small amount of Noodler's The Whiteness of the Whale ink can be transformed into pink or light blue with just a few drops of Shah's Rose or Navajoe Turquoise.

Our color chart abbreviates the color names as follows:

C = Cyan, or Noodler's Navajoe Turquoise
M = Magenta, or Noodler's Shah's Rose
Y = Yellow, Noodler's Yellow
K = Black, Noodler's Black

The 2nd horizontal row of this chart that creates colors with Noodler's The Whiteness of the Whale uses 5 parts white and one part of the original color in the top row.

The 3rd horizontal row of colors made with black uses 5 parts of the original color in the first row and one part black.

This chart only has a few examples of colors that can be created from four basic colors of Noodler's Ink. We encourage you readers to share your favorite ink mixing results!

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Comments

Thanks for this chart and all of the color mixing info. I was curious about this a while back and found that mixing colors is not quite as simple as I thought it was. Nr

Great article and nice color image of mixing fountain pen inks.

I did some similar experimentation with Herbin inks. My results are online here:

http://www.pentrace.net/ink102501_011.html

I like the CMYK approach. With Herbin inks, I recommend C = Bleue Pervenche, M = Rose Cyclamen, and Y = Jaune Bouton d'or.

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